Entries Tagged as 'Yoga & Meditation'

Tapas: Discipline

By Miraval's Alysa Volpe, Yoga & Meditation Specialist

Tapas is the 3rd of the Niyamas and it refers to the practice of discipline. In Sanskrit it means 'to burn'. This understanding of it leads one to recognize that with discipline one can burn away old patterns and habits that cause us harm.

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By: Jes Gale, Yoga & Meditation Specialist

Santosha, or contentment, is one of the five Niyamas. In the Yoga Sutras, a text of yogic philosophy, the sentence we are given about santosha roughly translates to: through contentment comes supreme joy. This is, and always has been, my favorite sutra.


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By: Alysa Volpe, Yoga & Meditation Specialist

The practice of cleanliness is the act of taking care of the places that we live in by keeping them sanitary and without filth or disease. This includes our planet, our homes, our bodies and our minds.


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By: Miraval’s MaryGrace Naughton, Yoga & Meditation Specialist

I love yoga! I practice yoga for a multitude of reasons all of which meet my need for expanded awareness and continued personal growth.

My first experience with yoga was in the late 80’s when I was going through a really rough time and desperately needed some support. I went to class 5 days a week directly after work.  I cried through some classes and many, many savasanas! Little did I know yoga would become a lifelong companion and continual support. When my body feels good, asana practice enhances that goodness. When my body feels tight and depleted asana and meditation help soothe stiff areas and bring energy to my body and mind. The practice of yoga has always been a physical challenge for me and I appreciate the challenge. Over the years, I’ve learned to become fascinated with subtle changes in my body from day to day and use these as opportunities for practicing self-acceptance. Yoga helps me build strength and maintain flexibility in my body and being.

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By: Jes Gale, Yoga & Meditation Specialist

The Yamas, or “observances”, are one of the 8 limbs of yoga. There are 5 Yamas. I like think of them as: good guidelines for life. They’re good guidelines because they lead us out of darkness and into the light, or we might say: out of ignorance and into knowing. Aparigraha (uh-par-E-grah-ha) is the 5th of these guideline. It translates loosely to “non-greed”, “non-clinging”, “non-attachment” or “non-hoarding”. Aparigraha challenges our belief that something outside of ourselves will make us happy.

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